Northern Ireland: 20 years of peace and reconciliation?

Appel à communication
Date limite de réponse : 31/08/2018

_____________________

Conference organised by the CRHIA (Research Centre for Atlantic and International History) of the University of La Rochelle, and

the ERIBIA-GREI (Research Group in Irish Studies) of the University of Caen

University of Caen, 5-6 October 2018

University of La Rochelle, 16 November 2018

 

Days 1-2 of the Conference (University of Caen Normandy, 5-6 October 2018)

Twenty years after the peace agreement signed in Belfast on 10 April 1998, an assessment is overdue, if only because of the political context in Northern Ireland. The regional institutions are suspended since January 2017, and the Brexit negotiations have not facilitated the search for a solution, especially as the confidence-and-supply agreement between the British Conservative Party and the DUP prevents London from acting as an honest broker between Sinn Féin and the DUP. At the same time, the issue of the Irish border has created tensions between Dublin and London.

There have been calls to scrap the 1998 Agreement, notably from some British Conservatives who argue that its deficiencies require a new approach. Its limits were recognised as soon as 2003 when American envoys like Richard Haass sought to help Northern Irish political parties overcome persistent difficulties in the region, such as flags, emblems and marches, and more generally the way in which to deal with a controversial past. The peace walls are still standing in Belfast, with no plans to dismantle them before 2023, while the rarity of mixed districts and the increase in “punishment beatings” show that Northern Irish society is not yet normalised.

The conference – organised with the University of La Rochelle, which will cover the cultural, literary, artistic and urban aspects of the question – aims at studying the political, social and economic results of the Good Friday Agreement over the last twenty years. Areas like cooperation between Dublin and London and the changing political landscape in Northern Ireland are obvious issues to be dealt with, but social and economic developments in the region are also relevant. The conference will furnish the opportunity of understanding the reasons for the decline in intercommunity relations since 1998 (if that is indeed the case), but also to look at the numerous initiatives that have sought to promote reconciliation, be it in the economy, the working environment, in schools or in the urban landscape.

According to Desmond Tutu, who presided the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa, reconciliation is not an event but a process. Did Northern Ireland miss an important stage in the promotion of reconciliation by not launching a similar commission? What comparisons can be made between Northern Ireland, South Africa, and other countries in South America or Europe?

Themes that could be studied during the conference include:

  • The implementation of the Belfast Agreement
  • The areas and achievements of cross-border cooperation
  • Changes in the Northern Irish political landscape
  • The consequences of Brexit for the Good Friday Agreement
  • International comparisons of intercommunity reconciliation
  • Historical commemorations in 2018 (1798, 1848, 1918, 1968, 1998)
  • The commemoration and historiography of the Good Friday Agreement
  • The role of Churches, organisations, and civil society in promoting reconciliation
  • The measures to help victims of the conflict
  • The persistence of social and economic difficulties

Proposals should be submitted before 31 August 2018 to olivier.coquelin@unicaen.fr / christophe.gillissen@unicaen.fr / alexandra.slaby@unicaen.fr and should include: 

-                      an abstract of 250-300 words

-                      the title of your talk

-                      a short biography of the author(s)

NB: Talks should be no longer than 20 minutes.

Accepted languages: English and French

Scientific Committee:

Olivier Coquelin holds a PhD in Irish history and teaches at the University of Caen Normandy where he is an associate member of the research group in Irish studies (GREI – ERIBIA).

Christophe Gillissen, professor of Irish studies at the University of Caen Normandy and director of the research group in Irish studies (GREI – ERIBIA).

Alexandra Slaby, senior lecturer at the University of Caen Normandy and member of the research group in Irish studies (GREI – ERIBIA).

 

Day 3 of the Conference (University of La Rochelle, 16 November 2018)

2018 marks the 20th anniversary of the Good Friday agreement, signed on 10th April 1998 by the British and Irish governments and most of the political parties in the province. The intervening years have borne witness to the difficulty in bringing the unionist and republican communities together and in dealing with the legacy of the conflict. The political situation has recently been further complicated by the inability of Sinn Féin and the Democratic Unionist party to restore power-sharing to Stormont. The resulting power vacuum could lead to revived tensions in the province, while Brexit, which is due to become effective on 31 December 2020, could have ‘a catastrophic effect on the peace process’. [1]

Brian Rowan, in his book on the conflict in Ireland ‘Unfinished Peace’, wrote that ‘the war and peace of this place has been, and is still, a long journey of learning’.[2] There is a continual need for dialogue, for understanding and justice – and for reconciliation, for a ‘future that does not echo the past’.[3] Paul Ricoeur, in his landmark work ‘Memory, History, Forgetting’, examined the relations between remembering and forgetting and how this interaction affects both the perception of historical experience and the production of historical narrative.[4] This philosophical essay, together with the works of Halbwachs, who considered memory to be a social practice that is shaped by participation in social groups,[5] provide examples of approaches that can help to build a framework for the analysis of the present-day situation in Northern Ireland, which in turn may lead us to an understanding of whether or not a peaceful, reconciled society can in fact emerge from the fractured memories of the past.

Transitioning toward this future Northern Ireland, if it is at all possible, will therefore require more than political summits and agreements. The role of culture and those who produce it will also be of primordial importance. One area in which culture can play a role is in providing sectarian-free spaces and relationships.[6] New quarters, buildings and tourist attractions may play a significant role in a culture-led regeneration of Northern Ireland. The Titanic Quarter in Belfast, which is now home to the Titanic Museum and is fronted by Rowan Gillespie’s statue Titanica, representing hope and positivity, is just one example. The role of culture and Art may also be examined through experiences like the Theatre of Witness, the work of playwrights such as Marie Jones and Owen McCafferty, the paintings of Colin Davidson and Rita Duffy, and the fiction work of Jennifer Johnston or Glenn Patterson, to give but a small number of examples.

[1] G. Moriarty, Brexit could have ‘catastrophic effect on peace process’, court told, Irish Times, October 4 2016.

2 B. Rowan, Unfinished Peace, Newtownards, Colourpoint Books, 2015, p. 14.

3 H. Morris, quoted in Unfinished Peace, B. Rowan, Colourpoint Books, 2015, p. 164-5.

4 P. Ricoeur, Memory, History, Forgetting, The University of Chicago Press, 2004 (Le Seuil, 2003).

5 M. Halbwachs, On Collective Memory, The University of Chicago Press, 1992.

6 L. McAtackney, “Remembering the Troubles: Community memorials, memory and identity in post-conflict Northern Ireland”, in Post Celtic Tiger Ireland: Exploring New Cultural Spaces, CSP, 2016.

Thus, the purpose of this 3rd day of conference will be to examine how Northern Irish culture reflects on and interprets this ‘unfinished peace’, and to study the different ways in which cultural productions can contribute toward the ongoing process of remembering/forgetting the conflict and creating spaces that may allow a new Northern Ireland to emerge.

Themes that could be examined include:

- Art and culture as a healing and reconciliation process

- Education (integrated schools, community cultural and social programmes)

- Media (new TV channels, radio stations, the press and blogs)

- Urban planning (monuments, districts, architecture)

- Tourist attractions and facilities (new places of interest, hotels, catering, gastronomy)

- Cultural events and venues (museums, theatres, cinema, festivals)

- Sports events

- Use of languages: English, Irish and Ulster-Scots

- Consequences of Brexit on cultural production, heritage and tourism in Northern Ireland

Timeframe

Proposals should be submitted before the 15 September 2018 to brigitte.bastiat@univ-lr.fr/ francis.healy@univ-lr.fr  and should include: 

-                      an abstract of 250-300 words

-                      the title of your talk

-                      a short biography of the author(s)

NB: Talks should be no longer than 20 minutes, or 30 minutes if you are using film extracts.

Accepted languages: English and French

Scientific Committee

Brigitte BASTIAT holds a PhD in Media and Communication Studies (University of Paris 8). She teaches English at the University of La Rochelle (France), is an associate member of the CRHIA EA 1163 (Research Centre for International Atlantic History), University of La Rochelle, member of SOFEIR (French Society for Irish Studies) and of EFACIS (European Federation of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies).

Frank HEALY, lecturer in English (CIEL), University of La Rochelle, CRHIA EA 1163 (Research Centre for Atlantic and International History), University of La Rochelle, member of SOFEIR (French Society for Irish studies) and EFACIS (European Federation of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies).

___________________________________

 

Jours 1 et 2 de la conférence (Caen, 5-6 octobre 2018)

Vingt ans après les accords de paix signés à Belfast le 10 avril 1998, l’opportunité d’un bilan en Irlande du Nord se justifie par un contexte problématique. Les institutions régionales sont suspendues depuis janvier 2017, et les négociations sur le Brexit ne facilitent pas un accord, d’autant que l’alliance parlementaire entre le Parti conservateur britannique et le Parti unioniste démocrate nord-irlandais (DUP) ne permet plus à Londres de jouer son rôle de médiateur entre le Sinn Féin et le DUP. De surcroît, la question de la frontière irlandaise envenime les relations entre Dublin et Londres.

Certaines voix se font entendre, surtout chez les conservateurs anglais, pour remettre en cause l’accord de 1998, dont les limites justifieraient l’abandon. Dès 2003, des émissaires américains comme Richard Haass avaient tenté d’amener les partis politiques nord-irlandais à trouver un terrain d’entente pour résoudre certaines difficultés persistantes dans la région, telles les questions des drapeaux et autres marqueurs de territoire, des défilés, ou encore de la manière d’aborder le passé difficile de l’Irlande du Nord qu’il ne soit plus un facteur de division.

On constate que les « murs de la paix » sont toujours dressés à Belfast et que leur démantèlement n’aura pas lieu avant 2023. La rareté des quartiers mixtes et la recrudescence des violences (punishment beatings) d’organisations clandestines contre les auteurs de « comportements antisociaux » montrent aussi que la normalisation de la vie nord-irlandaise n’est que partielle.

Ce colloque, organisé en association avec l’Université de La Rochelle qui prend en charge les aspects littéraires, culturels, artistiques et urbanistiques depuis la signature de l’Accord du Vendredi saint, sera l’occasion de porter un regard critique sur la mise en œuvre des accords de paix, depuis la collaboration entre Dublin et Londres jusqu’aux nouvelles configurations politiques en Irlande du Nord, en passant par les évolutions sociales et économiques. Il sera l’occasion de comprendre les raisons de la dégradation apparente de l’entente intercommunautaire depuis 1998, mais aussi d’étudier les initiatives dans le monde économique et professionnel, à l’école, ou encore dans l’espace urbain, qui ouvrent des pistes de réconciliation.

Selon Desmond Tutu, qui présida la Commission de la vérité et de la réconciliation en Afrique du Sud, la réconciliation n’est pas un événement, mais un processus. L’Irlande du Nord a-t-elle manqué un moment de « vérité et réconciliation » sur le modèle sud-africain ? Que nous apprennent les comparaisons entre l’Irlande du Nord, l’Afrique du Sud, et d’autres pays en Amérique du Sud ou en Europe de l’Est ?

Les propositions de communication pourraient porter sur les sujets suivants par exemple :

  • La mise en œuvre des Accords de Belfast
  • Les domaines et les réalisations de la coopération transfrontalière
  • Les changements dans le paysage politique nord-irlandais
  • Les conséquences du Brexit sur l’Accord du Vendredi saint
  • Les comparaisons internationales en matière de réconciliation
  • La commémoration et l’historiographie de l’Accord du Vendredi saint
  • Les commémorations d’événements historiques (1798, 1848, 1918, 1968, 1998)
  • Le rôle des Eglises, des associations, de la société civile en Irlande du Nord
  • La prise en charge et le devenir des victimes du conflit
  • La persistance de discriminations et les griefs socio-économiques

Les propositions sont à envoyer pour le 31 août 2018 à olivier.coquelin@unicaen.fr / christophe.gillissen@unicaen.fr / alexandra.slaby@unicaen.fr avec :

• Un résumé d’environ 250-300 mots

• le titre de la présentation

• une courte biographie

NB : la durée des présentations est de 20 minutes.

Langues : anglais et français.

Comité scientifique :

Olivier Coquelin, docteur en études irlandaises, professeur contractuel à l’Université de Caen Normandie, et membre associé du Groupe de recherche en études irlandaises (GREI) de l’ERIBIA (Equipe de recherche interdisciplinaire sur l’Irlande, la Grande-Bretagne et l’Amérique du Nord, EA 2610).

Christophe Gillissen, professeur d’études irlandaises à l’Université de Caen Normandie et directeur du Groupe de recherche en études irlandaises (GREI) de l’ERIBIA (Equipe de recherche interdisciplinaire sur l’Irlande, la Grande-Bretagne et l’Amérique du Nord, EA 2610).

Alexandra Slaby, maître de conférences à l’Université de Caen Normandie et membre du Groupe de recherche en études irlandaises (GREI) de l’ERIBIA (Equipe de recherche interdisciplinaire sur l’Irlande, la Grande-Bretagne et l’Amérique du Nord, EA 2610).

 

Jour 3 de la conférence (Université de La Rochelle, 16 novembre 2018)

L’année 2018 marque le 20ème anniversaire de l’Accord du Vendredi saint, signé le 10 avril 1998 par les gouvernements britannique et irlandais et la plupart des partis politiques de la province. Les années qui suivirent ont témoigné de la difficulté à rapprocher les communautés unioniste et républicaine et à gérer les conséquences et l’héritage du conflit. Tout récemment, l’incapacité du Sinn Féin et du DUP (Democratic Unionist Party) à restaurer le partage du pouvoir à Stormont a compliqué encore plus la situation politique. Par conséquent, le pouvoir laissé vacant pourrait raviver les tensions dans la région, tandis que le Brexit, qui doit devenir effectif le 31 décembre 2020, pourrait avoir « un effet catastrophique sur le processus de paix » 1.

Brian Rowan, dans son ouvrage sur le conflit en Irlande Unfinished Peace (Une paix non achevée), a écrit que « la guerre et la paix dans ce pays ont été, et sont encore, un long parcours d’apprentissage » 2. Il existe un besoin continuel de dialogue, de compréhension, de justice et de réconciliation pour forger un « avenir qui ne doit pas faire écho au passé » 3. Paul Ricœur, dans son œuvre de référence La mémoire, l’histoire et l’oubli, examine les relations entre le souvenir et l’oubli et comment la perception de l’expérience historique et la production du récit historique en sont affectées 4.  Cet essai philosophique, ainsi que les travaux de Halbwachs, qui considérait que la mémoire était une pratique sociale créée par la participation à des groupes sociaux 5, fournissent des exemples d’approches qui peuvent aider à construire un cadre afin d’analyser la situation actuelle en Irlande du Nord, qui, à son tour, nous permettra peut-être de comprendre s’il est possible qu’une société paisible et réconciliée puisse, de fait, émerger de la mémoire fracturée du passé.

La transition vers cette future Irlande du Nord, si toutefois elle est possible, requerra donc autre chose que des réunions politiques au sommet et des accords. Le rôle de la culture et de celles et ceux qui la produisent aura également une importance primordiale. La culture peut jouer un rôle en fournissant des espaces et des relations non sectaires 6. De nouveaux quartiers, bâtiments et attractions touristiques peuvent jouer un rôle significatif dans la régénération de l’Irlande du Nord par la culture. Le quartier du Titanic à Belfast, qui abrite maintenant le musée du Titanic et devant lequel se trouve la statue « Titanica » de Rowan Gillespie, représentant l’espoir et la pensée positive, n’est qu’un exemple parmi tant d’autres. Le rôle de la culture et de l’art pourra aussi être étudié à travers des expériences telles que le « Theatre of Witness » (théâtre-témoignage), les pièces de dramaturges tels que Marie Jones et Owen McCafferty, les peintures de Colin Davidson et de Rita Duffy, et les œuvres de fiction de Jennifer Johnston ou Glenn Patterson, pour n’en nommer que quelques-uns.

1 G. Moriarty, Brexit could have ‘catastrophic effect on peace process’, court told, Irish Times, October 4 2016.

2 B. Rowan, Unfinished Peace, Newtownards: Colourpoint Books, 2015, p. 14.

3 H. Morris, quoted in Unfinished Peace, B. Rowan, Colourpoint Books, 2015, p. 164-5.

4 P. Ricoeur, La mémoire, l’histoire et l’oubli, Le Seuil, 2003.

5 M. Halbwachs, On Collective Memory, The University of Chicago Press, 1992.

6 L. McAtackney, “Remembering the Troubles: Community memorials, memory and identity in post-conflict Northern Ireland”, in Post Celtic Tiger Ireland: Exploring New Cultural Spaces, CSP, 2016.

Ainsi, le but de cette 3e journée de colloque sera d’examiner comment la culture nord-irlandaise reflète et interprète cette « paix non achevée », et d’étudier les différentes manières dont les productions culturelles peuvent contribuer au processus en cours de mémoire/et d’oubli du conflit et à la création d’espaces qui pourraient permettre à une Irlande du Nord nouvelle d’émerger.

Les thèmes qui pourront être abordés sont :

- l’art et la culture comme processus de guérison et de réconciliation

- Education (écoles intégrées, programmes communautaires culturels et sociaux)

- Les médias (nouvelles chaînes de TV, de radio, presses, nouveaux blogs)

- Aménagement du territoire urbain (monuments, quartiers, architecture)

- Attractions touristiques et infrastructures (nouveaux lieux de visite, hôtels, logements, gastronomie)

- Evénements et lieux culturels (musées, théâtres, cinémas, festivals)

- Evénements sportifs 

- Les différentes langues d’Irlande du Nord : anglais, irlandais et Ulster-Scots

- les conséquences du Brexit sur la production culturelle, le patrimoine et le tourisme en Irlande du Nord

Les propositions sont à envoyer pour le 15 septembre 2018 à brigitte.bastiat@univ-lr.fr/ francis.healy@univ-lr.fr et devront inclure :

• Un résumé d’environ 250-300 mots

• le titre de la présentation

• une courte biographie

NB : Les présentations ne devront pas durer plus de 20 mn ou 30 mn si vous incluez des extraits de films.

Langues : anglais et français.

Comité scientifique :

Brigitte BASTIAT, docteure en sciences de l’information et de la communication, PRCE d’anglais au CIEL (Centre Inter-pôles d’enseignement des Langues), Université de La Rochelle, membre associée du CRHIA EA 1163 (Centre de Recherches en Histoire Internationale et Atlantique), Université de La Rochelle, membre de la SOFEIR (Société française d’études irlandaises) et d’EFACIS (European Federation of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies).

Frank HEALY, maître de conférences en anglais (CIEL), Université de La Rochelle. Membre du CRHIA EA 1163 (Centre de Recherches en Histoire Internationale et Atlantique), Université de La Rochelle, membre de la SOFEIR (Société française d’études irlandaises) et d’EFACIS (European Federation of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies).